Child-Jabbing Australian Doctor Drops Dead After ‘Adverse Reaction’ From COVID Jab




Australian physician Dr. Wilson Chin, an aggressive promoter of Covid jabs for children, dropped dead last week after getting vaccinated for Covid.

Chin relentlessly promoted Covid jabs and was one of the first physicians to start injecting children under the age of 12 after Pfizer’s experimental mRNA jab was approved for children aged 5-11.

The first two girls that Chin injected developed immediate convulsions, and it was initially believed that they died at his clinic. Chin was quick to tell reporters that the girls were fine and that their adverse reactions had nothing to do with the vaccinations they had just received from him.

Naturalnews.com reports: In the aftermath of the scandal, Chin whined and complained all over the media about the “threats” he was supposedly receiving. Then the holidays arrived, and Chin reportedly “passed away suddenly” on or around Christmas Eve at the age of 34.

Reports indicate that Chin’s death was “medically related” and “not mental health related.” We can only assume, based on the circumstances, that Chin died suddenly from the very covid injections he aggressively pushed on others and took himself. 

Around the same time that all this was happening, another prominent figure, ABC News reporter Erica Gonzalez, died unexpectedly.

The official date of Gonzalez’s death is logged as December 21, just three days before Chin’s. And like his, Gonzalez’s death bears the textbook signature of a post-jab sudden death, likely linked to a cardiac event.

Four days before that, CNN reporter Drew Griffin also died suddenly, though the network blamed it on his “long battle” with cancer. Then we have Dax Tejera, another ABC News reporter who died suddenly from a heart attack on December 23.

In related news, data out of Australia shows that ever since covid injections were rolled out in late 2020, births Down Under have plunged by an astounding 71 percent.

“December 2021 births were at least 11,000 fewer than any other month since 1975, the furthest back the data go online,” reports indicate.

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